A Digital Platform for Environmental Justice in Mexico: Tracking environmental justice through journalism or grassroots activism is an extremely dangerous activity in Latin America. In collaboration with several NGOs and Civil Society organizations we’re building a platform for analyzing data, and creating tools for participatory digital activism and community science.


Building a Coconut Coir/Soil Moisture Sensor with SMS: Wouldn’t it be great if you could automate your home irrigation? Wouldn’t it be cool if your coconut would communicate with you when it needed water? You’d be able so save water, money and become good friends with a coconut! Here is a tutorial on how to start communicating with one. It takes you from the very basic steps of installing modules, to soldering your cables, to setting up SMS, and later on… increasing the complexity by adding PV and automated irrigation. Good times!


Water Equity and Rationing in California (People’s Choice Award, BERC Cleanweb Hackathon 2015): Since 2011 many areas across California have experienced their drighest years on record, with conditions barely improving, and in some cases worsening, since then. Reservoirs and snowpack water content have recorded some of the lowest measurements ever recorded, with users (individuals, towns and cities) using groundwater to buffer the potentially devastating effects of the drought. Among other strategies…

A Brief History of Mexico and Oil: In 1979, Mexican President Jose Lopez Portillo (1976 – 1982) announced to the world that Mexico had begun exploiting ‘Cantarell’, the world’s third largest oil field at the time (just behind the Ghawar and Burgan fields of Saudi Arabia and Kuwait). This bounty came with promises of jobs, technological development, commitment to industrialization, and sustainable city-building. Above all, Lopez Portillo (and his team of experts) stressed that this windfall of wealth would be reinvested in Mexico to guarantee a future ‘beyond Oil’. It only took 24 years for Cantarell to reach ‘peak oil’ status. This means …


Paradox of Plenty: Innovation and Growth: The 2013 Global Innovation Index report describes different characteristics of countries that learn and innovate. There are ‘innovation leaders’ or those that have succeeded in creating well-linked innovation ecosystems where investments in human capital thrive in ‘fertile and stable innovation structures’. There are also the ‘innovation learners’ – which include a group of 18 middle income countries that are 10% or higher above the trend line (Republic of Moldova, China, India, Uganda, Armenia, Viet Nam, Malaysia, Jordan, Mongolia, Mali, Kenya, Senegal, Hungary, Georgia, Montenegro, Costa Rica, …